Everyday is an Adventure. Embrace it

Adventure Indiana

I vividly remember my first trip to Indiana; how huge I thought Indianapolis was. I remember not understanding how the entire middle of the state was the “city” and the enormous amount of traffic flowing through and around it. Ah, the good old days.

I also remember how I thought the city stunk. I had never smelled city air before and it was very different from my home in the Tennessee valley. But one thing I never expected was for this state to grow on me. (I found out it smells great if you escape the city!)

What types of Adventure await in Indiana? Well, that will depend on your interest level in nature and history.

Historic Indiana Adventures

Admire Architecture

History means different things to different people. Downtown Indianapolis is rich with its developmental history. The city host beautifully colorful buildings of many sizes. There’s a revolving restaurant named Eagle’s Nest situated atop the Hyatt Regency Hotel that slowly rotates. From here you’ll observe breath-taking 360 degree panoramic views of the city.  This place is pricey, but dubbed one of the most scenic & romantic places in the US.

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Eagle’s Nest at night

Another attraction downtown is the oldest building in Indianapolis, Christ Church Cathedral located on the Monument Circle.  It’s an English Gothic Revival style structure built 1857. Personally, this is one of my favorite buildings.

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Christ Church Cathedral

While you’re in Monument Circle, check out the awesome statue situated in the middle! At Christmas time, lights are strung from top to bottom to create a giant “Christmas tree”. Every winter I’ve been there, I’ve also seen large nut cracker statues and horse-drawn buggies in the streets.

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Architecturally speaking, Indiana is home to almost 500 covered bridges in just a few counties (Parke & Putnam Counties out west of Indianapolis & Rush County is east of Indianapolis). Although these bridges are scattered through the state, the highest concentration are in the above mentioned counties. Southern Indiana has a vast amount of historically preserved metal bridges.

 

One of my favorite places is Oldenburg Indiana. It’s commonly know as the Village of Spires. There’s a massive number of German styled buildings with beautiful steeples or Spires on them. There’s a German festival held here annually. The street signs are written in English and German.

Musical History

Indiana is home to many famous musicians, artist, writers, producers and studios. From Jazz to Hard Rock, Indiana has a rich musical history.

Elvis’ last performance was in Market Square Arena in downtown Indianapolis on June 26th 1977.

John Cougar Mellencamp’s boyhood home town os Seymour, Indiana. It’s a mid-sized town south of Indianapolis. If you want a guided tour, you could pick up a copy of “The Roots of an American Rocker” on CD. Listen to it as your cruise through Seymour.

Another famous musician from Indiana is Michael Jackson! (This of course would include the entire Jackson clan.) The Jackson family began in Gary, Indiana. That’s far northwest in the state just south of Chicago. This is another drive-by and see from your car type visit. The town is mostly falling apart, but his boyhood home is immaculately kept and there’s a monument to admire.

On your way to the Jackson home, stop in and see Lafayette, Indiana. This was the home town of many punk rock & hard rock artist including Axel Rose, Izzy Stradlin, Rise Against, and many more. It’s located northwest of Indianapolis and southeast of Chicago.

Southern Indiana is considered part of the Upland South. A term used by many to describe origins of country music.

American Indian Adventures

Mound State Park is located in Anderson, Indiana which is north od Indianapolis. If you’re looking for a more centrally located museum, The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art is located in downtown Indianapolis on Washington Street.

The Indian Chief Tecumseh’s monument is located in Vincennes, IN (very southwest of Indianapolis by a few hours drive).

Battleground Indiana is a small town rich in Native American history. Read more here http://www.battleground.in.gov/history/

Prophetstown Indiana is another small town in Lafayette Indiana where the Prophetstown State Park is located. It’s named after Tenskwatawa.

These are just a few to explore. When you arrive in Indiana signs, pamphlets, and the Hometown folks will point you to additional sites. Indiana is also home to arrowhead hunting like many other states are. Arrowhead hunting is not actually hunting in the conventional sense. It’s basically just walking and looking down as you take each step. Many farmers in their youth found artifacts laying on top the ground after plowing their fields or stuck in the tread of their tractor tires. So, hunting is really just being observant.

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Small points

Outdoor Adventures

Clifty Falls in Madison Indiana is a favorite for many hikers. It’s located to the extreme south-east of Indianapolis near the Ohio State line. The trails are moderately challenging and the scenery is beautiful. In the fall, the autumn colors paint a beautiful palate and in the spring the moss begins to spread a gorgeous soft bed atop many of the massive rocks.

Brown County Indiana is where the Brown County State Park is located due south of Indianapolis. The locals have dubbed the area “The little Smokey Mountains”.  Personally, being from Knoxville and spending a lot of time in the real Smokey Mountains, I don’t see the resemblance.  Brown County is also home to a small town Nashville Indiana. It’s been compared to Gatlinburg Tennessee, but again… It’s so tiny, I don’t see it.

There are many other Adventures waiting for you in Indiana, I haven’t experienced. Try out rafting pr canoeing in Tippecanoe, or exploring the Indiana Caverns in southern Indiana. If northern Indiana is more your thing, head out to Dunes State Park.

If you’ve found a special spot worth sharing that I haven’t mentioned, please let me know in the comments below!

I’ll be adding some more photos to this article soon 😉

Love,

Chrissy

I need to write & I’m not alone.

Roland Millward

I have been told “you are special” my entire life, but I never paid it any mind since everyone is special in God’s eyes.

I was born to a very young couple that were madly in love but couldn’t take care of me and my brother. At two and a half months old I was a very sick baby and my mom was living out of her car. She couldn’t afford milk formula and said I didn’t keep it in my tummy anyway. She decided adoption was the best way to give me a chance in life. That’s what made me special, or at least I was told. Adopted children are chosen, not accidents.  So throughout my childhood, I was reminded on a daily basis that I was adopted, immediately hospitalized due to malnutrition, and blessed by God. And I’ve always believed it was true. God protected me then and has never left me.

At 19 I…

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This is a guest post authored by Mr. Roland Millward. He is well travelled and host a travel blog. I would love one day to travel to Pisa, but until then…Roland gives us a descriptive visual of this beautiful place and amazing structure.  Love always, Chrissy

 

Italy is famous for its beautiful countryside, lakes, history and architecture including the Leaning Tower of Pisa. In 2016 I was privileged to go on a tour of Italy which included a stop in Pisa with a visit, of course, to the famous Leaning Tower.

The history of this tower is intriguing and I would like to tell you about my visit.
The Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy

Work started on building the tower in August 1173 and it was completed in 1399. At completion, it was originally 60m high but today it is 56.67m on the highest side and 55.86m on the lowest side, with getting close to 300 steps to get to the top. It was quite early during the build that the tower began to lean.

The tower is for the bell to summon the worshippers to the Basilica. There is also a Baptistery forming a row of buildings, the Baptistery first, then the Basilica and headed up by the Tower of Pisa. Unbaptised Catholics were not allowed into the Basilica and hence the Baptistery is a separate building.

As the tower was built there were attempts to correct the leaning by adding structures at another angle. This means that if the leaning tower today was stood upright it would still be wonky as a result. If you look carefully at the tower you can see the change of angles as the tower was built. The reason for the lean of course is the soft ground and it has also affected the Baptistery and Basilica but due to the width of these buildings, this is not really noticeable.

The Leaning Tower of Pisa is now Stable

There have been many attempts to prevent the Tower of Pisa from falling down. There is a good reason not to straighten it – the tourists would not come in the same numbers! The most recent work has finally stabilised the tower and it now sits leaning at about 17 feet (5.18m) off the perpendicular. This final work was completed in 2001 and the tower is no longer moving towards disaster. You can pay to climb the steps to the top of the tower but make sure that you are fairly fit and be prepared for a strange feeling due to the lean. If you wish to climb the tower and it is advisable to book tickets in advance to avoid disappointment on the day. Numbers are limited.

Standing at the base of the leaning tower and looking upwards made me feel quite dizzy and others standing next to me felt the same way. It must be our brains trying to straighten the tower coupled with the fact that beautiful white cumulus clouds were moving across the sky. It was a weird feeling!

Interestingly, the word Pisa comes from an ancient Greek word meaning ‘marshy land’, which perhaps in hindsight, should have given the early engineers and architects a clue about how good and deep the foundations should have been.
The Leaning Tower of Pisa - photo taken from a side street

The City of Pisa – More than the Leaning Tower

Pisa has more to offer than the leaning tower. It is a famed also for its university, which is the 19th oldest in the existence in the world, founded in 1343. The students form a large part of the population of the City of Pisa. The University of Pisa is a public research university and has students of the highest calibre. (see the photo below)

There are some beautiful buildings in Pisa and it’s well worth exploring away from the area that the leaning tower is located. Many of the tourists turn up on coaches, look at the tower and leave so even a few hundred yards away it can be much quieter to explore and take in the everyday Pisa. If you ever do get the opportunity to visit the Leaning Tower of Pisa make sure you allow enough time to take in much more of this interesting and beautiful Italian city.

The University of Pisa Italy

I hope that you have enjoyed a glimpse into a visit to The Leaning Tower of Pisa. This post has been written by guest blogger Roland Millward from England. You can read his blog here at Roland Millward – Blogging about Life, People & Travel.

Why is the water brown in Galveston?

I asked this question myself the first time I saw the sea at Galveston Island, Texas.

Is the ocean really Brown at Galveston?

Yes

Is the water dirty on Galveston Island?

No, not really dirty in the sense you mean.

Answers… I promise answers.

I wondered these things myself and before I would stick one toe inside the water there, I looked it up. I wanted a scientific explanation (dumbed down enough that I could understand.) I mean… Is brown water in Galveston safe?

Here’s why the ocean water is brown in Galveston:

The Gulf of Mexico is fed in part via the “Loop Current”. This is a nifty term that scientist like to use 😉    This ocean flow (or current) send warmer water from the Yucatan Channel northward into the Gulf of Mexico. As this current comes in it bends and then heads towards Florida.

( I am no artist, but I drew a diagram to help you visualize.)

Loop Current ChrissyAdventures

Loop Current brings in warm water

The Loop Current is one of the strongest and fastest in the Atlantic Ocean. This is what happens in the lower portion of the Gulf of Mexico.

Now… the upper portion of the gulf is affected by other factors. Look at my terrible diagram and notice the pink arrows from Louisiana towards Texas. Notice how the current is kissing the coast of Texas there?

The Mississippi River empties into the Gulf.  Not considering the tributaries this river has, the Mississippi alone carries roughly 2 million tons of sediment each day. This sediment is dumped into the Gulf waters around and near Louisiana heavier than other areas. But this sediment is also joined by sediment from the Red River. You see, the Red River joins up with the Mississippi to create the Atchafalaya River. Guess where that river empties…

Yep, it’s the Gulf of Mexico. Are you starting to see a trend?

Sediment of Mississippi River Map Gulf of Mexico

Sediment of Mississippi River as indicated by red markings

The currents (above in pink) indicate how the sediment in carried in two directions. Those currents carry a large portion of sediment to the coast of Texas.  Sediment in other beach areas of the US have sea flora on the ocean floor that help trap sediment and clear the water. The ocean around Galveston is mostly shallow. Shallow water has a high sand and sediment turnover … literally. Therefore the water has a brown color that cannot be seen through.

The brown ocean water is very warm, almost tepid. Although it is murky water, it’s thoroughly relaxing to swim in the warm water.

Have you been to Galveston and seen the brown water? Did it bother you or did you enjoy it just the same! If you’d like to read more about Galveston Island, please click here to visit a guest post I wrote about it for Mr Roland Millward’s Travel Blog.

While we were in the Dallas-Fort Worth area in northern Texas, we asked several folks, “what is there to do in Dallas?” or “What are things to do in North Texas?” Often we were told about local parks. We did visit these local parks and were pretty disappointed. So began our search online to find things to do and places to go and adventures we could enjoy in North Texas. We discovered the panhandle area and the beautiful photos of that area. Amarillo was also in that neck of the woods, so we thought…

Why not?

I can’t remember if it was my husband or I that found Palo Duro Canyon State Park, but the pictures online were absolutely gorgeous. We dug out some Best Western travel cards and found a pet-friendly Hotel in Canyon Texas.   We prefer a Hotel to other accommodations.  After we booked our room, packed our bags (and our dog), we hit the road.

My husband chose our route based on the less travelled. He knew it would take longer to drive from Dallas to Canyon Texas, but it would allow us to see smaller towns, avoid toll roads and several hours of bumper to bumper traffic where cars freely weave in & out on multi lane bridges like they’re on a Nascar track. (I’ll share those back road adventures in another article.) The total drive took us roughly 6 1/2 to 7 hours. Please keep in mind, we drove easy, stopped often and enjoyed the sites along the way. The drive from the DFW area to Canyon would have taken only 4 1/2 to 5 hours if we were more destination focused.

Arriving in Canyon Texas, a small town about 20 minutes outside Amarillo Texas, we immediately noticed it was a cozy place. Main Street literally being its main attraction, the people were very welcoming and the traffic was slow. The pace of life was much more easy-going. The weather was beautiful.

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The entrance to Palo Duro Canyon is about 8 to 10 minutes away from the Best Western Hotel in Canyon Texas. The following morning we had coffee and packed a couple of bagels, various snacks & plenty of water for our adventure.

One of the most important thing to do in Palo Duro Canyon is stay hydrated. The weather there can be tricky and the canyon floor can easily reach over 110 degrees for several hours each day.

At the entrance we waited in line for about 25 minutes before we paid $5 per person. It’s important for any visitor to know that this park is highly populated as well as many of Texas’ other state parks. In the event the park is at full capacity, the Park Rangers pass out tickets to hold your place in line until they’re able to allow admittance (which can take up to 4 hours). I highly recommend being one of the first in line or you may not be able to visit the park on the day you arrive!

Palo Duro Canyon is very well-kept. The park rangers regularly patrol the canyon for exhausted visitors that may need a little aid. There were signs posted everywhere stating at least a gallon of water per person was recommended for each hour. We sweated this much or more and drank about a gallon an hour each on the trails.

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Shortly after we entered there was a beautiful look-out point fabulous for taking photos! We also noticed the cabins located off to the right. The park rents these cabins out for overnight stays. They looked very nice, but we did not go inside any of them.  Traveler tip: If you are looking to rent a cabin, do it well in advance – possibly several months out.

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From that point we ascended down on a curvy road toward the bottom of the Canyon. We passed the theatre area where the Texas Musical Play was presented in the evening. Ticket were available for purchase, but we did not attend.

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Next there was a store/deli/tourist shop. The prices were a bit higher there then if you weren’t inside a Texas State Park but not too terribly unreasonable.

What did they sell inside the Trading Post?

They made homemade ice cream which was absolutely delicious and I highly recommend you try at the grill! One serving was large enough to share but not knowing, we ordered two. Their french fries were absolutely great and my husband’s said their hamburger was totally delicious. They also sold water and gasoline for those who were low on fuel. This was also the place to find t-shirts, postcards, and any other tourist gift and memorabilia to commemorate a visit.

There were too many campsites to count. We saw primitive, modern, and large RV Park sites as well. There was also a section on the far side of the park for equestrians. The camping sorts available were numerous and we saw people from all walks of life on different budgets enjoying their stay.

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There’s a small stream of water that normally runs through the bottom of the canyon according to the Trail Maps. The creek beds were mostly dry when we were there.

The many hiking trails were varied from super easy to extremely challenging. I loved hiking there because the brush and trees provided shade to cool off at different intervals.

The dirt in the Palo Duro Canyon is red. The rocks are many colors though. The contrast was beautiful and made for some gorgeous photos.

The flora in the canyon included small & large trees, several types of flowers and cacti, and many tumbleweed type bushes. The creatures we saw in the canyon include lizards, rabbits, roadrunners, turkey and other birds. Signs along the way read that it was possible to encounter other types as well, but we didn’t. I was a little afraid that we would be in contact with a rattlesnake, but we got lucky and never saw one.

Things to do in Palo Duro Canyon included:

Biking, Hiking, Camping, RV Park, Bird Watching, Horseback Riding, Caving, (we saw at least 3 caves for the brave to explore. I wasn’t one of the brave!) and much more.

It was a dusty adventure in the Palo Duro Canyon. We stayed for about 5 1/2 hours on the trip hiking roughly 10 miles that day. When we left we were covered in the dusty red dirt from the second largest canyon in the United States.

It was rather surprising that the Palo Duro Canyon was so little known to the various folks we spoke to in Texas area. I don’t understand how such an awesome place was so unrecognized by the locals.

Enjoy the slide show and leave me a comment about things to do in Texas. I love suggestions!

 

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Have you ever heard it said, “Everything is bigger in Texas”?  I’m here to tell you it’s true.  Almost everything I saw while I was there was much bigger than any place I’ve traveled.  Here’s a touristy perspective of Texas.

  1. The sky is bigger in Texas. It’s HUGE!  The sky is massively vast and will consume not only your immediate vision, but your peripheral vision too. Have you ever taken a photo with a fish eye or panoramic lens? That’s the best way I can describe how your eyes perceive the sky in Texas. In fact it’s so encompassing, your mind may go into shock. I remember the first time I saw the Atlantic Ocean from the shore line & how vast I thought it was. I was filled with awe. In comparison, the ocean seems so manageable after seeing the sky in Texas. And that is an honest compare after seeing the ocean from almost every beach on the east coast and the gulf. It’s just big. 20170520_204824_HDR
  2. Food is bigger in Texas. The chicken fried steak is bigger than the plate it’s served on. A serving of biscuit & gravy is enough to feed a family of 4. Tea glasses are so big, I had to use two hands to drink it. The only small food servings you can find are at National Chain restaurants like Olive Garden or IHOP.20170613_142325
  3. The spiders are bigger in Texas. So are the cockroaches. One evening I was having a smoke on the patio and a cockroach at least 5″ long and 2″ wide came walking up to me like everything was normal. I screamed, stomped it and it just looked at me and walked away!
  4. The crows are bigger in Texas. They’re a Mexican breed I was told. They have an eerie scream like a sound effect from a horror movie. They’re also big enough to pick up a Buick and fly off with it. (That may be a slight exaggeration.)
  5. Trains are bigger in Texas. They’re really long with several engines pulling them. Actually many towns were either made or broken by the Railway. The northern part of Texas being rather flat allowed for easy railway access to transport goods. These same railways were the cause of a few ghost towns too. Trains are a bigger deal in Texas than many other states.
  6. The affluent population is bigger in Texas. Look up a town named Plano, TX. Enough said!
  7. The highways are bigger in Texas. I’ve been in some congested cities, but oh my… If you haven’t been to Dallas on a bridge over a bridge that’s over another bridge that’s over the toll road below…you haven’t lived. Most of the highways, interstates and toll roads are 5 or 7 lanes wide all the way and up to 150′ tall.
  8. The traffic congestion is bigger in Texas! I don’t care where you live or how bad your roads are, if you haven’t driven to Dallas, Houston, or San Antonio in Rush hour you’ve never seen bad congestion.
  9. The tolls are bigger in Texas. It can easily cost over $20 one way on one road to go about 35-40 miles…without getting off on an exit (which is when you’re usually charged for a toll)
  10. The shopping options are bigger in Texas. Name a national or regional store. It’s in Texas along with thousands of home grown mom & pop shops.
  11. The windmills are bigger in Texas. The largest windmill farm in the U.S is in Texas in the town of Electra.20170611_155805
  12. Jalapeno peppers are bigger in Texas. Oh I’m sure there’s a town here or there in other places that love jalapenos but in Texas almost every restaurant will off you a jalapeno with your order. Order a hamburger, you’ll get a jalapeno. Order a salad, you’ll have jalapenos sprinkled on it. Want an ice cream? Guess what they’re going to offer you on the side:     Jalapeno!       Every grocery store has a large display of jalapeños they show off with much pride.
  13. Electric company choices are bigger in Texas. In every neighborhood, folks have a choice of at least 2-10 electric companies. Shoot… at home, half of my state has 1 electric company!
  14. The hiking trails are bigger in Texas. Hiking is a big deal for folks in North Texas. Afterall, they either live on a farm in the middle of nowhere or are crammed into a city with millions of people. Nature takes their mind off all that. Every hiking trail we found was so crowded with thousands of people, it was difficult to enjoy nature…you couldn’t  hear nature for the conversations & people!
  15. Pride for their state is bigger in Texas. Texans love other Texans and they love their state. They are living in a state that has almost every terrain possible in the US and almost every weather pattern. Texas could easily be self-contained and self-supporting. The economy in Texas is great and the job market is ripe. Texans take pride in their heritage and home lands. Don’t underestimate a Texan either. Most are well educated and street smart too (which is a nifty combination). Many folks fly the Texas state flag in their yards. Businesses fly it just under the United States Flag or right along next to it.  I understand now why so many people are dedicated to their state here. It truly is The Great State of Texas.
  16.  Mom and pop retails stores are conveniently located all over the state. I love to shop the home-grown entrepreneurs and the products are usually unique and home grown. There is a pride weaved into every product and “Bigger than Life” dose of love gently added to each piece. You don’t have to drive or fly all the way to Texas to experience some of the unique products though. Shopping on line has made it easy.

 

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Hope Faith and Love

Faith Hope Love

I met one of the most beautiful ladies recently. She is lovely with a gentle nature.  When she talks, life radiates from her eyes. She’s a good conversationalist and well-educated.  Her spirit is meek and kind.   She has had many experiences in her life & been blessed with opportunities to work in many fields (that I often found interest in my younger days).  Her eyes sparkle when she smiles and she has no idea she is special.  She loves the Lord and knows him well.

Who is this beaming woman of whom I write? She’s a new friend that lives close by.  I am blessed to have met her.  I don’t think it was a coincidence we met either. She makes me happy when we talk or get to spend time together and I think I needed this.  Although she smiles, there is pain there as well. Who doesn’t carry some of that with them, right? Somehow her inner sadness touches my heart and I pray for her gentle spirit to be healed.

When life seems bleak, how do we cope?  When the lights go out and we are alone, where does the mind go for comfort? Those who are gifted seek out positivity to remind themselves how beautiful life can be.   They hold tightly to Hope. Embracing it and seeking signs of it around each corner.  They know that their Faith leads them there – to Hope of all things.  It’s that same Faith that tells them they are worth loving.  Faith that they know our Savior loved us enough to die for us.  Love that they know they are deserving of.

But… what of those without this gift? The gift that helps them continually seek out encouragement? Where do they go in their mind when they are swimming in doubt?  I scares me to think about it.

Where do you go for your uplifting dose of inspiration? Is it a person, place, thing or a website?

I have added a group to Facebook for the Chrissy Adventures Page.  The group is designed to be a place that is positive and inspirational. I post there every day …well, maybe not every day.  But, I shouldn’t have to. I encourage everyone to share positive and/or inspirational posts in the group.

The group is open to the public to join, but only for a limited time. This group may become private at some point.  I would absolutely love it you’d come join in!  I have many friends that love to write. This would also be a good place to share your positive or inspirational writing.

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Here is a link to the group. Please “join” and then feel free to share the group with your friends. You can even add your friends to the group if you like.  The goal is all about making a positive experience in a negative world. I have admired many of your writings and I would love it if you would take time to share those writings in this group as an active member adding others as we go along.

 

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